2019 Spring Conference

2019 Spring Conference – Friday, May 3, 2019

The CNS Board is delighted to announce our program for the annual Spring Conference. Our program this year features two expert speakers whose sessions will be both informative and thought-provoking.

Agenda

8:30am – 9:00am
Registration and Continental Breakfast

9:00am – 12:30pm (Morning Session)
Feedback and Testimony That Sticks: The art of vivid, accessible communication with patients, colleagues, and the courts
Karen Postal, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

12:30pm – 1:15 pm
Lunch (provided)

1:15 pm – 2:15 pm (Afternoon Session 1)
Performance and Symptom Validity Assessment of Children and Teens:
Emerging Research to Clinical Practice
David Baker, Psy.D., ABPP-CN

Break 2:15 pm – 2:30 pm

2:30 pm – 3:30 pm (Afternoon Session 2)
Lewy Who? An Update on Lewy Body Dementias
Samantha Holden, M.D., M.S.

Location

Boettcher Mansion
900 Colorow Road
Golden, Colorado 80401
720-497-7630

Online Registration & Prices

Register Early as Seating is Limited
Registration Deadline: April 16, 2019

Click to register using PayPal.

CNS Member $120
Non-CNS Member $150
CNS Member Student $65
Non-CNS Member Student $75 (includes $15 joining fee)

Additional Information

Morning Session
Feedback and Testimony That Sticks: The art of vivid, accessible communication with patients, colleagues, and the courts
Karen Postal, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

With neuropsychological feedback our challenge is to partner with patients and families in constructing a shared understanding of the assessment in a manner that positively alters lives. When feedback is done well, it is vivid, accessible, therapeutic, empowering, and one of the most difficult things we do. The first two hours of the presentation focus on the Feedback That Sticks research project, capturing feedback philosophies, metaphors, analogies and stories from seasoned clinical neuropsychologists. The last hour focuses on the Testimony That Sticks research project, sharing the fruits of 4-years of in-depth interviews with seasoned forensic neuropsychologists, psychologists, attorneys and judges, presenting compelling analogies, metaphors, and succinct explanations of assessment processes and findings, as well as principals of productive expert testimony for direct and cross examination.

At its heart, the workshop is about disrupting the academic communication style learned in our years of scientific training that results in a net loss of our ability to communicate clearly and simply about the neuroscience we love. It is about shedding jargon, giving ourselves permission to allow emotion to creep back into our language, freeing up our body language, and using vivid, clear, language allows us to create moments of genuine, productive communication with patients, families, colleagues and the courts.

Karen Postal is the immediate past president of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, and an instructor at Harvard Medical school. Her research focuses on helping clinicians and neuroscientists improve communication with patients and the general public. She is the author of Feedback that Sticks: the Art of Communicating Neuropsychological Assessment Results, and Testimony That Sticks: the Art of Communicating Neuropsychology and Psychology to Juries. Dr. Postal has a private practice dedicated to helping people think better in school, at work, and throughout later life.

Afternoon Session 1
Performance and Symptom Validity Assessment of Children and Teens: Emerging Research to Clinical Practice
David Baker, Psy.D., ABPP-CN

Performance and symptom validity assessment has historically been focused on adult populations, often in a forensic setting. Over the years, however, validity testing of children and adolescents has become more common and is now being viewed as an essential component to pediatric neuropsychological evaluations. However, suboptimal effort, symptom exaggeration, and even malingering is often assessed, defined, and interpreted differently in children than it is in adults.

David Baker, Psy.D., ABPP-CN is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and serves as a Pediatric Neuropsychologist in the Rehabilitation Psychology Program at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Dr. Baker is involved in the supervision and training of externs, interns, and postdoctoral fellows. Dr. Baker has specific interest and expertise in traumatic brain injury- more specifically, concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in children and teens. He has published numerous journal articles and book chapters related to mild TBI and performance validity assessment. Along with seeing hundreds of concussion patients each year, he also routinely conducts evaluations on children with various other neurodevelopmental conditions.

Dr. Baker received his bachelor’s degrees (English Literature and Journalism) from University of Colorado at Boulder and his masters and doctoral degree in clinical psychology from the Georgia School of Professional Psychology. He completed an internship in pediatric psychology/neuropsychology at Primary Children’s Medical Center in Salt Lake City, UT and a two-year fellowship in pediatric neuropsychology at University of Utah and Primary Children’s Medical Center where he helped create their concussion program. Dr. Baker is licensed as a clinical psychologist in the state of Colorado and is board certified in clinical neuropsychology through the American Board of Professional Psychology.

Afternoon Session 2
Lewy Who? An Update on Lewy Body Dementias
Samantha Holden, M.D., M.S.

Despite being the second most common cause of neurodegenerative dementia, Lewy body dementia is often under-recognized or misdiagnosed, with patients requiring an average of three separate clinical evaluations before the correct diagnosis is reached. Clinical features of Lewy body dementias will be reviewed in detail, in the context of the most updated diagnostic criteria for Parkinson’s disease dementia (2015) and dementia with Lewy bodies (2017). Recent and future clinical research in Lewy body dementias will also be reviewed.

Dr. Holden assesses and treats patients with both cognitive and movement disorders in her clinical practice at the University of Colorado Memory Disorders Clinic. She completed fellowship training in both Behavioral Neurology and Movement Disorders, and is board-certified in Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychiatry. Particular areas of clinical and research interest include Parkinson’s disease dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, and other atypical parkinsonian conditions. Dr. Holden obtained her B.S. in Neural Science from New York University and her M.D. from Stony Brook University School of Medicine. She completed her medical internship and neurology residency at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL.

Conference Objectives

For the Morning Session, participants will be able to:

  1. List specific ways that traditional academic communication patterns prevent moments of genuine, productive communication with patients, families, colleagues and the courts.
  2. Describe several techniques for disrupting traditional academic communication patterns and creating vivid access to neuropsychology during feedback conversations and courtroom testimony.
  3. Distinguish person-centered credibility (how judges, attorneys, and jurors typically understand credibility) from methods-centered credibility (how academically trained experts understand credibility).

For the Afternoon Session 1, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the emerging but growing research in the pediatric field by highlighting one specific population with higher invalid base rates (i.e., mild TBI.).
  2. List the varying methods of pediatric performance and symptom validity assessment.
  3. Recognize how to interpret and make sense of invalid findings.
  4. Explain how to communicate clearly to patients, families, and referring sources when validity concerns are detected.

For the Afternoon Session 2, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize clinical features that would indicate a diagnosis of a Lewy body dementia versus other neurodegenerative dementias.
  2. Differentiate Parkinson’s disease dementia from dementia with Lewy bodies based on current diagnostic criteria.
  3. Implement the 2017 diagnostic criteria for dementia with Lewy bodies.
  4. Recognize the current barriers to clinical trials in Lewy body dementias and identify potential ways forward.

This program is approved for 5.5 hours of continuing education. The University of Denver Graduate School of Professional Psychology (GSPP) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. GSPP maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Questions?

For additional information or any questions, contact
Jennifer Peraza, Psy.D. at Jennifer.Peraza@dhha.org.

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